Robyn's Nest Home Page
Home Page

Soy Beverages Are Not Formulas

divider

Robyn's Nest Related Articles
Milk Allergies
Food Allergies

Bottle Feeding



soy baby formula vs soy beverageFDA CONSUMER MAGAZINE (with permission) REPRINTED AND UPDATED FROM DHHS PUBLICATION NO.(FDA) 91-2236

A severely malnourished 5-month-old infant was admitted to Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock, Ark., in February 1990 with symptoms including heart failure, rickets, vasculitis (blood vessel inflammation), and possible neurological damage. According to the hospital, the baby girl had been fed nothing but Soy Moo since she was 3 days old. Soy Moo is a soy beverage sold in health food stores.

This kind of soy beverage, sometimes improperly called "soy milk," should not be confused with soy-based infant formulas. Unlike true infant formulas, which are nutritionally complete and appropriate for infants, soy beverages are lacking some of the nutrients infants need. Analysis of Soy Moo by the Arkansas Children's Hospital revealed deficiencies in calcium, niacin, and vitamins D, E and C.

Labels on Soy Moo cartons and literature about the drink do not suggest that Soy Moo be used as an infant formula.

In addition, an FDA investigation found no evidence that the infant's parents were explicitly told that Soy Moo could be used as a baby's sole nourishment. Nevertheless, Soy Moo's distributor, Health Valley Foods, Irwindale, Calif., has voluntarily stopped distribution until new labels stating "Do Not Use As Infant Formula" can be printed.

FDA learned of a similar incident that occurred in April 1990 when a California couple questioned a physician about their 2-month-old daughter's failure to gain weight. The physician discovered that the baby had been exclusively fed Edensoy, another brand of soy beverage. A midwife had recommended Edensoy to the parents, according to the FDA investigator assigned to the case.

In response to this incident, Edensoy's manufacturer, Eden Foods, Clinton, Mich., wrote all its retailers in the United States and Canada to remind them that Edensoy is not an infant formula. In addition, the letter said, "Please make sure that no store personnel suggest or imply that Edensoy or other soy beverages are suitable for use as infant formula."

In an effort to prevent this problem with similar soy beverages, FDA asked all 68 known manufacturers, importers, and private label distributors of these products to include a warning against using the beverages as infant formula. The agency does not, however, have the regulatory authority to require this warning.

Soy drinks like the ones above should never be used as infant formula because they are not nutritionally complete as a sole source of food for infants.

True infant formulas made with soy proteins, such as those shown below, may be used for babies who can't digest lactose, the main carbohydrate in cow's milk formulas.



Robyn's Nest Related Articles
Milk Allergies
Food Allergies

Bottle Feeding


divider

Robyn's Nest Quick Link

You can also do a Keyword Search

divider

Robyn's Nest
email

  


About parents babies Advertise mom baby Jobs pregnancy Legal child birth Privacy toddlersIn the News/Awards

© 1996-2010 by NYBOR, LLC All rights reserved.
All material on this Internet site is protected by U.S. and international copyrights. Only personal use of such material is permitted. By accessing this page and this site, you expressly agree and consent to the foregoing terms and conditions.

Soy Beverages not the same as Soy Formulas


 


Bookmark and Share