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Your Baby's Hearing Checklist

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Your Child's Hearing (Ears)
Ear Infections
Speech and Language Development
Speech, Language and Hearing Problems
Auditory Processing Disorder in Children



Hearing The following checklist can help alert parents to possible hearing problems in their children.

Robyn's Nest suggests printing this check list should you suspect a problem and taking the completed form with you to the child's pediatrician or family doctor.

Birth to 3 Months

Yes
No
 
Reacts to loud sounds.
Is soothed by your voice.
Turns head to you when you speak.
Is awakened by loud voices and sounds.
Smiles when spoken to.
Seems to know your voice and quiets down if crying.

3 - 6 Months

Yes
No
 
Responds to his/her own name, telephone ringing, someone's voice, even when not loud.
Knows words for common things (cup, shoe) and sayings ("bye-bye").
Makes babbling sounds, even when alone.
Starts to respond to requests such as "come here."
Looks at things or pictures when someone talks about them.

6 - 10 Months

Yes
No
 
Responds to his/her own name, telephone ringing, someone's voice, even when not loud.
Knows words for common things (cup, shoe) and sayings ("bye-bye").
Makes babbling sounds, even when alone.
Looks at things or pictures when someone talks about them.
Starts to respond to requests such as "come here."

10 to 15 Months

Yes
No
 
Plays with own voice, enjoying the sound and feel of it.
Points to or looks at familiar objects or people when asked to do so.
Imitates simple words and sounds; may use a few single words meaningfully.
Enjoys games like peek-a-boo and pat-a-cake.

15 to 18 Months

Yes
No
 
Follows simple directions, such as "give me the ball."
Uses words he/she has learned often.
Uses 2-3 word sentences to talk about and ask for things.
Knows 10 to 20 words.

18 to 24 Months

Yes
No
 
Understands simple "yes-no" questions (Are you hungry?).
Understands simple phrases ("in the cup," "on the table").
Enjoys being read to.
Points to pictures when asked.

24 to 36 Months

Yes
No
 
Understands "not now" and "no more."
Chooses things by size (big, little).
Follows simple directions such as "get your shoes" and "drink your milk."
Understands many action words (run, jump).

The following questions can be helpful to your child's doctor in diagnosing hearing problems.

Do others in the family, including brothers or sisters, have a hearing problem?

Did the child's mother have medical problems in pregnancy or delivery (serious illness or injury, drugs or medications)?

Was the baby was born early (premature)?

Weight at birth:_______.

Did the baby had physical problems at birth?

Does the child often rub or pull on ear(s)?

Has the child had scarlet fever?

Has the child had meningitis?

The child had _____ ear infections in the past year.

The child has colds, allergies, and ear infections, once a month_____ more often_____.

Reproduced in part from 1995 National Institutes of Health
NIH Pub. No. 95-4040



Related Articles
Your Child's Hearing (Ears)
Ear Infections
Speech and Language Development
Speech, Language and Hearing Problems
Auditory Processing Disorder in Children


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Baby's Hearing Checklist


 


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