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Foster Parenting 101

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Robyn's Nest Related Articles
Foster Parenting FAQ's
12 Skills for Successful Fostering/Adopting
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There are 560,000 children in the foster system across the United States. There are only 142,000 licensed foster homes. Of those children, 20% or approximately 110,000 are eligible for adoption.

Everyone needs love and attention, especially children. For many reasons some children need to be separated from their families for a short period of time and sometimes they need to be separated permanently. You can help these children lead happy and healthy lives by dedicating yourself to becoming a foster parent.


What is foster parenting?

It's caring for a child until his or her parent(s) can resume this responsibly, or until a permanent home is found.

It is a duty to help a child through a difficult period in his or her life. It is a job for people who can provide love and guidance…and then let go.

It may be the toughest and most rewarding job you'll ever do.


As a foster parent, you can do your part to help provide many things for children in need.

You can provide:

A temporary home, or
Emergency care (usually a month or less) until a plan for ongoing care is made, or
Day-to-day care for a longer period

You provide troubled parents with a means for solving pressing problems. Foster care permits parents to work out any problems and hopefully allows them to once again care for their child.


Who are the children in foster care?

Many children are in foster care because their families have suffered a major life crisis.

Children get separated from their parents, and for many reasons including:

  • Physical or sexual abuse
  • Neglect or abandonment
  • Illness of a parent either physical or mental
  • Death of parents
  • Emotional or behavioral problems from the child

Children who need foster care come from all backgrounds. They're of every age, race, and religion. Some have siblings who need foster care too. All are very special and unique and need love and attention to help them grow up happy and healthy.

Some foster children have special needs. Some need extra attention or specialized care because of:

Disabilities, either physical or mental
Language differences
Emotional or behavioral problems.


The rewards are endless when caring for a child who is put in foster care. By fostering a child you gain a sense of satisfaction knowing that you played an important role in helping a family in need. You get a sense of pride in your abilities as a parent. And, most importantly, you gain love that may be returned to you now and in the future from the child that you succeeded in helping.

Robyn's Nest Related Articles
Foster Parenting FAQ's
12 Skills for Successful Fostering/Adopting
Adoption Agencies State by State
Pregnancy Support Services State by State



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Foster Parenting 101 - Robyn's Nest ~ The Parenting Network


 


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